UGH, you weren’t expecting to cold call- Inbound Sales to the Rescue

I started Sage Lion Media because I was passionate about the outdoors and pretty good at design. Having to sell my services was nowhere in the picture. I thought my work and a small link back to my website from the footer of our projects was all I needed to climb the ladder of success. That was enough, for awhile but the business slowly plateaued, I just couldn’t grow without making changes.

Luckily 2017 was a year of changes here at Sage Lion. We stopped being a design agency and transformed into a GROWTH Agency. Our number one mission is to help our clients grow. I owe a huge amount of this transformation to my Hubspot Coaches Katie Carlin and Dan Tyre. I was recently nominated by Katie and chosen to participate in Dan’s Pipeline Generation Bootcamp. Dan is a Director at Hubspot and was charged with helping me learn how to pick up the phone and call prospects. Good luck.

But over the course of eight weeks with 8 other “lions”, individual homework assignments, intense roleplaying, and one on one coaching I slowly came to realize the phone can be a powerful tool for developing leads and mastering the inbound sales process.

Here are my takeaways.

What motivates you?

I can show you the most amazing technique for improving your sales process but if you aren’t motivated to do them, every single day, you’ll quickly find excuses not to do them anymore. I’m too busy, let me just check this one thing, then I’ll call. Being able to re-center yourself around what’s truly motivating you will keep you grinding through the bad days. I’ve got a picture of my motivations pasted right next to my computer. It really helps.

Having a little fun can set you apart from the junk that ends up in your prospect’s inbox.

It’s ok to have fun.

This one is pretty easy for me. I’m naturally a likable kind of guy and I enjoy chatting with people most of the time. The problem is your targets don’t want to talk to you. So how do you get around that? Try to have some fun. Send quirky email subjects.

One of my recent favorites to a saltwater guide: I spooked you like a trout angler casting to a permit.

Include .gif’s in your emails.

Subject: Hello from the outside…

Are you in there?

 

 

The reason I’ve been reaching out is that I see opportunities on your site to attract more clients. I know that my company can make a huge difference in Sage Lion Media LLC’s outreach and I would really love the opportunity to talk.
Is there a good time to catch you at your desk in the next few days?

Having fun makes you memorable and the best part is they actually work…

You can’t assume every person is going to hang up on you.

Be there to help- seriously.

Don’t go into a sales call trying to sell. You’ll probably get slaughtered. I go into every call looking to help my prospects. Before I call I’ve spent around 20 mins looking at their site and trying to find opportunities to make the site work harder. The other side of the coin is the people you are calling may actually need help and they know it. You can’t assume every person is going to hang up on you. Every time I pick up the phone I remember to breathe, I glance at my motivation board and tell myself they need your help.

You need to practice.

If you’re like me and you’ve never done sales calls you need to start role-playing. It’s weird at first, but it goes a long way to give you confidence in your own skills. If you have a buddy who is in sales practice with him. He’s probably heard it all. How will you answer questions like:

How can I help you?

Why are you calling?

Who are you?

We don’t need any.

Try this one the next time an unsuspecting prospect picks up the phone. “Ugh, looks like you weren’t expecting my call.” You have to really sell the ugh, you might even get a few to laugh.

Personalized efficiency helps.

The Hubspot Sales tools go a long ways in helping you identify and connect with potential customers, quickly and easily. I’ve built out a series of prospecting sequences I send out to all my targets. But you need to take the time to personalize each email to the needs of your prospect. If you don’t, you’re no better than a spammer. Remember you are always helping.

You owe it to your employees.

This goes back to my first point finding your motivations. As a small business owner I need to be driving the sales of the company. I’ve made too many excuses in the past which was cheating our team. Knowing that the team is relying on me motivates me to get off my ass and start calling.

What will motivate you?

 


Three Simple Fixes To Improve Your Wilderness Therapy Website

Building a website can be surprisingly easy these days. Sites like Wix and Weebly provide free templates so you can create a site without hiring someone else. Building a user-friendly website is a different story. While free website templates are great tools for people just starting their wilderness therapy business, the bigger you grow, the more problems can arise. Here are three simple fixes to improve your wilderness therapy website you can tackle yourself. 

Why Does My Website Need To Be User-Friendly?

Have you ever walked into a grocery store and saw eggs in the candy aisle or cleaning supplies next to the meat department? If you had, you probably wouldn’t go back to that store. When you walk into the grocery store you want to be able to find everything you need as quickly as possible. This is advantageous for the grocery store because you’ll keep coming back.

This is exactly why websites need to be user-friendly. If wilderness therapy clients can’t find what kind of programs you offer, how to apply, or even what you’re trying to sell, they’ll Google a different site. Development, design, and content all play a role in a user-friendly website.

Your website might not need a full overhaul but it is worth checking to see if your site is working optimally. No need to pick up the phone and call us just yet though. These three simple fixes are something you can do on your own.

If potential wilderness therapy clients can’t find what kind of programs you offer, how to apply, or even what you’re promoting, they’ll Google a competitor.

1) Can Potential Clients Easily Find The Application?

So you’ve spent hours and thousands of dollars creating a beautiful website. The images and content chosen for each page have meaning and tell a story. However, once a user decides they want to apply, it takes them 15 minutes to find the application. This is assuming they took the time to find it. Making the application process simple begins with making it easy to find.

The Fix: Add a button on your menu bar that says, “Admissions.” Include a dropdown with options to, “Apply Now” and “Admission Details.” Another option is to include a button on your homepage, “Apply Now!” And don’t just place it anywhere on your homepage. Make sure it’s easily viewable to users so pin it on a header image or right below it.

2) Is The Content Easily Readable?

Before I started, Sage Lion Media, I dreaded the process of job hunting. I’d find a job posting for a company but when I went to their website, they used so many corporate buzzwords and marketing jargon I had no idea who they were or what they did. Creating fancy copy for websites, newsletters, and emails is great. So to quote Mark Twain, “Don’t use a $5 word when a 50 cent word will do.”

Outdoor therapy clients can get lost in embellished copy but also too much text. It is important for wilderness therapy companies to provide detailed information about their services, clinical experience, and philosophy but it needs to be scannable for users on your website.

The Fix: The content on your website should be understandable and scannable for all users. Send your website to friends and family and ask them if it makes sense. Do they understand your mission and purpose? Then, ask them if they needed to find out where your clinical therapists got their undergrad from, how quickly they can find it.

If it takes them a while to sift through their bios, break up the paragraphs. Include headers and subheaders. Bold or italicize keywords in the text. Apply this to other pages on the site so users can quickly find the information they need.

3) Is Your Website Mobile-Friendly

Building a website that can be viewed on a computer and phone is incredibly important. If potential clients can’t browse your website waiting in line at the bank or over their lunch break, they’ll find another wilderness therapy company. Not only do you want people to be able to look at your website while on the go, according to Similar Web, mobile devices drive 56% traffic to websites. This means that even when people aren’t waiting in line or running errands, they are using their phones to surf the web instead of their desktop.

The easiest way to check if your wilderness therapy site is mobile-friendly is to enter the website URL on your phone and see. If you have to pinch the screen to make the whole page viewable, the site is not mobile-friendly. You can also use Google’s free tool to check.

The Fix: Ok this one can be easy if you’re set up properly. WordPress offers several themes that are mobile-friendly/responsive. Just select one of the themes and voila! Your website is now mobile-friendly.  To add custom themes and tailor it to your company’s vision, takes a little more work. Our growth driven design philosophy has helped convert hundreds of websites to a mobile-friendly site.

Creating The Perfect Website

Using the resources to improve your wilderness therapy website is a worthwhile investment. It takes time. And it takes trial and error. Your wilderness therapy website should constantly be evolving based on data as well as usual growing pains. The content on your website today should not be the same content on your website in five years. The calls to actions (CTA) on the site should be updated to your company’s needs. There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to a wilderness therapy website but reviewing these three simple fixes is a good start.  

Need some advice or help on your website? Contact us today for a free, 30 minute, non-salesy, call. We’ll review your current website and provide at least 3 actionable takeaways to help you improve immediately!


Why Segmenting Emails Is Important And How The Heck To Do It Before #GivingTuesday

In 2016, 40,000 nonprofits participated in #GivingTuesday with more planning to join the movement this year. Email marketing has the highest ROI for nonprofits so it’s important your nonprofit is heard over everyone else. Taking the time to segment your #givingtuesday email list can drastically improve the results of your campaign. Segmenting your audience will not only get people to open the email but also click on the link and donate! Don’t believe us? Check out these stats:

Now, do you believe us? Ok, great! Another thing we know is most nonprofits have little time, a small staff, and microscopic budgets. Even though the statistics show how beneficial segmenting your email list can be, it can seem like a daunting task. Before you get overwhelmed, take a look at our five easy steps for segmenting your email audience so you can increase your donations on #GivingTuesday.

1. What’s Working?

Even though your list isn’t segmented yet, you’re probably having some success with your email campaigns. Analyze your email marketing statistics and see where you’ve had success. Are there more opens on Tuesday’s at 7PM than Friday’s at 9AM? Was there a particular email that had amazing results because your team put a lot of effort into the message of the email? Are your emails falling into the dreaded spam filter? Whatever it is, make notes of where there have been successes.

2. Remove Inactive Participants

There is nothing more annoying than receiving a piece of junk mail in the mailbox. Unfortunately, marketers who send direct mailers can’t see who kept the piece of mail and who didn’t. Luckily, marketers using email have the ability to see who is opening their email and who is deleting it right away. Instead of continuously emailing these people in hopes that this email will be the one they open, remove them from the list. Receiving junk mail can leave a bad taste in donors mouths which can hurt their chances of donating in the future.

3. Define Your Purpose

Defining what will make a successful campaign and what data will help is important to figure out before segmentation. Do parents tend to donate more than people without kids? Are students in college volunteering more than they donate? Figuring out different metrics and understanding how they affect your overall goal can help with segmentation. At this point, you can use the data you have on hand but moving forward, start thinking about other metrics that will help and start asking for them when collecting information.

4. Segment Your List

Now that you’ve made note of successful email campaigns, cleaned up your list, and defined your metrics, it’s time to get to the nitty-gritty. No matter the size of the list, each recipient has a different reason for being included. Some are past donors who made a one-time donation a year ago. Others are active volunteers. A good majority could be people who have never donated but have shown interest in the cause. Whatever their reason for being on the list, breaking them into smaller groups and sending a more personalized email addressing their needs can increase your open rate by 14.32%! Some ideas for segmenting are:

  1. Donor vs. Non-Donor
  2. Donation Frequency
  3. Corporate Sponsor vs. Individual Donor
  4. Email Engagement History
  5. Organizational Interest
  6. Age
  7. Gender
  8. Location

5. Create Your Content

Constant Contact found that 56% of people unsubscribe when the content isn’t relevant so segmenting and creating highly targeted and personalized content will help avoid this problem. If one list includes people who have never donated before, does it make sense to send an email immediately asking for a donation? Probably not. Instead, ease them in by telling them about your nonprofit and how it’s benefiting their community. Share a story of a dog who was rescued from a tough situation and now they’re in a happy, fur-ever home. Take a look at our post on effective storytelling for nonprofits for more ideas on creating relevant and powerful content.

Segmenting emails will:

  • Increase open rates
  • Provide relevant content to subscribers
  • Decrease unsubscribe rates
  • Increase donor leads
  • Increase donations
  • Decrease mail going to spam

Taking the time to segment email lists can seem daunting at first but it is important for nonprofits to do to increase the overall success #GivingTuesday. Using these simple steps will get you started to a bigger, better, and more impactful#GivingTuesday.

Has your nonprofit seen success with email segmentation? Share your experience with us in the comments!


Four Common Reasons Your Emails Are Being Marked As Spam On #GivingTuesday

Nonprofits are rushed to create an email campaign which takes time and money that most of them don’t have. Once the email is created, a few test sends are fired off to a personal email and a few work email addresses and if all goes well, the email is then automated to send to donors. While you might look at this as a success, the reality is 1 out of 5 emails sent are marked as spam. This means 20% of the emails your nonprofit sends never reaches donors meaning less brand awareness and fewer donations. $15,000 is lost in donations every year due to spam filters so it’s important to take a look at reasons your emails are being marked as spam on #givingtuesday.

What Are Spam Filters?

Spam filters operate similarly to how Google pushes popular articles to the top and illegitimate articles to the bottom of searches. It’s based on algorithms only people with no lives will figure out and is ever-changing. As spammers become more creative, spam filters need to stay ahead and keep shutting them down. Spam filters are great as people do not like receiving junk mail but can hurt nonprofits who haven’t taken the time to make sure their emails aren’t marked as spam, especially when you’re rushing to execute a last-minute #givingtuesday campaign.

Below we’ll take a look at what you can do to avoid being marked as spam and free software available to help!

1. Sending Irrelevant Content

A lot of email is marked as spam for the simple reason that people are being sent emails that have no relevance to them. While nonprofits want to believe subscribers will just click, “unsubscribe,” instead, people will mark it as spam to make sure they never receive an email from this organization again. Spam filters can take it a step further and if emails are never being opened and sent straight to the trash, email providers like GMail and Outlook will start marking them as spam before the recipients even have a chance. Segmenting your email list can make sure relatable and useful content is being sent to the proper people. 

2. Sending Emails To People Without Permission

When creating an email list from scratch, nonprofits can instantly feel defeated with the lack of subscribers they have. Instead of building a list organically, they might purchase a list. Purchasing a list can put you in direct violation with the CAN-SPAM Act and instantly put you on the spam list for future email sends.

Instead of purchasing lists, take the time to build your list organically. Not only will you receive fewer spam complaints but it will also increase your open rates by 5X!

3. Not Including An Unsubscribe Link

Nobody wants to see people unsubscribe from their emails so marketers will not include a link thinking this will increase open rates. Wrong! This actually frustrates recipients and so they mark the email as spam. Email providers have caught on so they’ll mark these emails as spam before they even reach their inbox. Make sure to have an option on all emails to unsubscribe from the list. When they click this button, send them to a landing page asking for a reason they chose to unsubscribe and use this data to improve your email marketing.

4. Using Too Many Spam Words

Spam filters go a step further by reviewing the content in emails and if there are too many spam words like, “FREE MONEY!”, “Act Now!”, they’ll immediately mark it as spam. They’ll review both the body of the email and the subject so to make sure your email isn’t too “spammy”, avoid using common spam words. Comm100 has an extensive list of words to steer clear of. Sometimes these words are unavoidable but do your best to limit how many times you mention them.

Software Options

There is no guarantee that email providers won’t mark an email spam even when avoiding common mistakes. To help improve the chances of your email hitting the inbox of your recipients, try out these free services.

MailPoet: MailPoet is a free service that will test your spam score while editing your newsletter.

GlockApps: GlockApps will not only test your spam score before you send an email but it will provide tips on how to improve the email and increase deliverability and open rates all for free.

SendForensics: Compare your deliverability results to other nonprofits in your area with SendForensics. They provide free spam checks as well as email data from similar organizations to make sure you’re results are better than the rest.

SpamOwl: SpamOwl reviews your email to make sure it’s not full of “spam words.”  

Making sure your #GivingTuesday email lands in people’s inboxes is important for the success of your nonprofit. Reviewing these common mistakes email marketers make and applying them to your campaign can help increase open rates, click throughs, and donations.


What makes an effective nonprofit story?

A powerful story can help your donors cross from casual reader to impassioned donor. An effective nonprofit story pulls on the emotions of the viewer. It cuts to the heart of the viewer, engages their emotions and demands they take action. It’s one thing to tell your story in a way that inspires. It’s another to motivate your supporters to share your story with their friends and family. But an exceptional nonprofit story inspires, motivates, and excites friends and family to share with their friends and family creating a domino effect of brand recognition and increased donations.

But an exceptional nonprofit story, inspires, motivates, and excites friends and family to share with their friends and family creating a domino effect of brand recognition and increased donations.

By including the five story elements listed below, you can bring like-minded individuals together to rally around the change you’re making in the world especially if you’re working towards an effective #GivingTuesday campaign.

1. Beginning, middle, and end.
Every story has a structure similar to what you see here:

It’s typically called the story arc or a chronological sequence of events.

The three-part model mentioned above carries this progression:

  • Beginning: Problem. Explain the problem that you set out to solve.
  • Middle: Solution. Describe how the character solved their problem with your help.
  • End: Success. Get people excited about the results.

Directors, authors, and marketers use this model to help share their stories. Any good story has these three elements but the story arc is just the beginning. The structure of events along the story arc weave together the events and the characters of the story. The great, Kurt Vonnegut, hypothesized there were 6 emotional arcs in story:

In fact, a group of students in the Computational Story Lab at the University of Vermont in Burlington has finally proven, without a doubt, that Vonnegut and his thesis were correct. It’s a fascinating read.

2. A relatable character

All stories are driven forward by characters. A good goal is creating characters your audience can relate to on a personal level. A good starting point is working with your buyer personas or fictional recreations of your most important donors.

 

3. Emotion

In a 2009 study published in The Annals of the New York Academy of Science, Professor Paul Zak asked his subjects to watch two videos. One tells the emotional story of a father whose son is dying of cancer and who is struggling to find a way to connect with the boy. The other is a more static, storyless video of the father and son taking a walk in the zoo. Professor Zak determined that those that felt empathetic after watching the video had a 47% more of the neurochemical oxytocin in their bloodstream. Our body responds to the power of emotion by releasing chemicals that elicit action.

Zak’s team ran a second experiment where they gave money to the subjects that they could spend as they pleased. Zak’s team found the subjects who produced the highest levels of cortisol and oxytocin were “more likely to donate money generously.”

4. Resolution
All stories need some kind of resolution. It’s why your viewers sat through your video for the last 5 minutes. It’s exciting, it’s suspenseful, and it’s satisfying. It’s here you want to show the users how your relatable characters overcome their problem by using your organization.

Connect the protagonist to the services of your organization to educate your audience on the scope of the problem and inspire them to be part of that solution.

5. Call To Action
The final piece of the puzzle is to ask your protagonist to take some kind of action. Hopefully, your audience is feeling inspired but they may not know the best way to act on that feeling. Enter the “Call to Action.”

Your CTA will depend on your organization’s goal, but should always be action-oriented. Some common call to actions include:

  • Donate – Giving money to your organization
  • Volunteer – Giving time to your organization
  • Advocate – Publicly supporting or recommending an organization, policy, or person
  • Fundraise – Raise funds through an event or fundraising site
  • Subscribe – Signing up to receive publications such as an email newsletter

Everything you do to market your nonprofit is another chapter in the story people hear from you. An effective nonprofit story versus a good story can make the difference between keeping your donors and volunteers connected or losing them to the next admirable cause.


The Marketing Undercurrent- Relevant digital news for Outdoor Marketers

We’re super excited to launch the Marketing Undercurrent here on the blog. The
Marketing Undercurrent is the latest medium at Sage Lion Media to inform you, the Outdoor Marketer of the latest technology trends happening online.

Our goal is to keep you quickly informed through short videos on new tools and techniques to boost your business and drive leads to your website.

We want to make things simple and Marketing Undercurrent is here to keep you in the know with what’s happening online.

You can read our blog posts at Sage Lion Media or you can check our YouTube channel.


How to identify and organize your IFTD trade show attendees before the show starts

It doesn’t matter how good your product is if no one knows it exists. IFTD/ICAST are massive trade shows with lots of shiny doodads begging for attention and lots of qualified trade show attendees. Your success is heavily dependent on pre-event marketing. The more planning and work you do ahead of the show the more attention your product is going to get at the show.

Before we do any major marketing efforts we need to know who is going to be there. Here are some tips for identifying who will be at the show this year:

1) Use a CRM to organize your leads into personas

Prior to any touch points, we need a way to organize our contacts into a CRM. Hopefully, you’ve got a good CRM in place already. If not, we use and love the HubSpot sales CRM. Whichever CRM you use it should do the following:

1. Segment your audience into personas or segments.

The segments you’d probably want to target for IFTD are:

  • Flyshops
  • Manufacturers
  • Buyers
  • Blog/Media
  • Ambassadors

The big reason we need to segment our audience is so that we can send different content to different audiences. Stat after stat shows the power of personalization on email opens and click-throughs . For example, the tone and content of an email to an Instagram ambassador are going to be different than an email to a buyer from a fly shop.

2. Track your interactions automatically.

When sending emails or making calls during your pre-marketing phase, you need to keep a record of who you’ve talked to and when. Any good CRM should do this for you automatically.

2) Utilize your existing network

The simplest list to put together is your existing list of clients and contacts. You’re looking for present clients, prospects, and ambassadors. If your sales team has it’s own list of contact consolidate them into one central location.

Don’t start spraying emails to the attendee list. You need to cut it down and plug it into your persona list

3) Trade show attendee registration list

Your second audience is the trade show pre-show registration list. If you’ve never received this information from the show organizers, contact them about receiving or purchasing it. The registration list is an essential source of information for your pre-show marketing efforts.

It’s important not to blast out an email to all these registrations. You need to cut it down and plug it into your persona list above. This way you can deliver specific content to those that match your personas.

The hard way to find trade show attendees.

So far we’ve relied on existing resources to gather emails. The following two options require a little more legwork to identify attendees.

4) Use Social Media

Another creative way to identify trade show attendees is to monitor social media.

  • Search for hashtags on social networks. Popular tags in the past are #IFTD2016, #ICAST2016 etc.
  • Join groups on LinkedIn ( Angling Trade posts a lot of good info on the show)

5) Web Tracking tools

Use tools to monitor mentions on the web like the Moz Fresh Web Explorer. This tool will search the web over the last 4 weeks and look for mentions of the search terms like IFTD.

Once you’ve found a potential contact you will need to try and gather their email. If you can avoid sending an email to info@company.com or something similar. Also, contact forms are often black holes. If you need to find a real person, tools like Hunter.io are perfect for reaching out to small sites and one-person blogs.

Simply enter a site into the tool…

And you’ll get some of the emails associated with the domain. It’s not always perfect, but it’s a good starting point.
Putting the time and effort into your pre-marketing is essential in any trade show marketing plan. Hopefully, these tools and ideas can help you find success at this year’s IFTD show.


What’s so smart about a SMART Goal?

When we are in the Discover phase of a website build or a Growth Driven Design project one of the first things we do is try to discover a few S.M.A.R.T. Goals. S.M.A.R.T. Goals are critical for long-term marketing success.

A SMART goal stands for:

  • Specific – Your goal should be unambiguous and communicate what is expected, why it is important, who’s involved, where it is going to happen and which constraints are in place
  • Measurable – Your goal should have concrete criteria for measuring progress and reaching the goal
  • Attainable – Your goal should be realistic and possible for your team to reach
  • Relevant – Your goal should matter to your business and address a core initiative
  • Timely – You should have an expected date that you will reach the goal

not smart goal

A good set of SMART Goals helps us stay focused on specific tasks we need to complete to reach project milestones.

We looked at a bad SMART Goal above, here are a few good examples from recent projects we worked on:

  • Increase total number of online donors by 15 percent in six months 1,652 in 18 months
  • Double our user session duration from 1:07 (average of combined domains) to 2:14 in three months
  • Increase new and returning web visitors to site by 45 percent in five months- Target by end of May- 26,000 per month

Typically, marketers might have goals for Visits, Contacts, and Customers for the year, quarter, or month and the numbers are closely related to each other. We’ve found that focusing on one of these specific segments gives the clearest vision of success.

  • Visits – You should focus on visits if you are just getting started with your website, or if you already have good conversion rates for visits to leads and leads to customer, but need additional traffic to add some fuel to the fire
  • Contacts – You’ll want to focus on Contacts if you are satisfied with the amount of traffic to your content, but you are not getting enough leads for sales. This is the segment that most HubSpot users focus on
  • Customers – Focus on this If you are getting a healthy amount of traffic to your content, visitors are converting on forms, but the leads just aren’t ready to close into customers

Goals are an essential part of a marketer’s success. Marketing goals are like personal goals you set for yourself: Meeting them makes you feel on top of the world. Effective. Inspired. However, missing your goal by a few customers, contacts or visits can incite just the opposite.


3 marketing story types to help sell your product

Story has been one of the most efficient ways for humans to communicate for centuries. Everything we do online is telling a story. It’s the story people hear from you that tells them what your product is and what it’s like to use your product. A great story means a great experience for your customer. And they are more likely to:

  • Share that experience with their peers.
  • Remember that experience.
  • Have a desire to repeat that experience.

We are going to look at 3 marketing story types that can help you sell your product.

 

In its simplest form a story has 7 main parts, Exposition, Problem, Rising Action, Crisis, Climax, Falling Action, End.

 

Concept Stories

Concept stories help people get excited about your product. It highlights how customers think about your product. A great concept story tries to answer the following questions:

  1. Who is the product for?
  2. What is the product?
  3. What does this product need to do?
  4. What is the straightforward solution to the problem?

Let’s imagine we have an amazing product called “MAKE IT FLOAT”. Breaking down a concept story into our seven parts (Exposition, Problem, Rising Action, Crisis, Climax, Falling Action, End)  might look like this

marketing story types concept story

Origin Stories

Origin stories are a little different. This type of story is not about the product directly but more about how a customer first became a believer in your product. On the surface concept and origin stories look very similar.  A concept story is big picture and origin stories start to get into the finer detail of why and how a customer first uses a product.

A MAKE IT FLOAT origin story might look something like this:

marketing story types origin story

Usage Stories

Usage stories are based around using your product step by step. They are even more tactical than origin stories. Often these are created by staff showing the product in the field.

In our MAKE IT FLOAT example our usage story looks like this:

marketing story types use story

Marketing story types as storytelling

Everything you do to market your business is another paragraph, page, or chapter in the story people hear from you. And the story people hear is the one they act (or don’t act) on, and repeat (or don’t repeat) to others. Using story telling in marketing can be an extremely effective way to deliver messaging about your products to your customers.


3 Twitter video ideas outdoor marketers should be creating

The explosive growth of online video continues to dominate social media. We are starting to see interesting statistics on the effectiveness of video as a marketing platform.

The numbers are staggering. So what can we do to take advantage of these stats?

Twitter Video Ideas people actually want.

Adweek created a compelling infographic that highlights how impactful video can be on Twitter. The infographic is packed full of great statistics to help outdoor marketers become power users on the Twitter app. While all of these numbers should be studied carefully, the one that stuck out to me was the type of content users wanted from a video.

twitter video ideas

Based on these stats we put together a video that highlights 3 video ideas for twitter.